Eye Health

A familiar sight. The elusive eye chart, where we squint and squint to try to read the microscopic letters and numbers, in hopes of passing the test with full colors. But did you know that according to a recent University of Michigan poll, 1 in 5 Americans ages 50-80 have missed out on getting their eyes checked within the past two years.

So why does this matter? Well, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), it is recommended that in order to detect eye conditions such as cataracts, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and age-related macular degeneration (AMD), seniors ages 65 and over at minimum, need an eye exam at least every other year, and those ages 55-64, at least once in a three year period. Early detection is crucial!

At your eye exam visit, a vision-care technician will generally check your eyesight, peripheral vision, and the ability of your eyes to work together/move in all directions. In addition, a thorough examination of your outer eye is done, to check both the retina/optic nerve. Dilation in this case is common, as the vision-care technician is looking for any remnants of a potential eye disease.

So who should you see, an optometrist or ophthalmologist? Well, according to Consumer Reports, for the routine stuff (eye exams, prescriptions), the optometrist will do just fine. But if one has concerns over issues with eye infections, or a serious eye disease, certainly the ophthalmologist, as they are more specialized in their training and licensed to do surgeries if needed.

But what if my insurance does not cover eye exams? Well, good question. With routine eye exams costing upwards of $150 per visit, many turn to stand-alone vision plans to help cover some of the costs. No fear! Here at The Harrin Group in San Antonio, TX, we can help you secure vision insurance for you and your family at a very reasonable cost. For more on vision care, check out our dedicated page and if you would like an “instant quote” on vision plans, we have that available as well.

Source: The University of Michigan, Consumer Reports